The decision of jig in the short story hills like white elephants by ernest hemingway

They are at a crossroads, unsure of which direction to take as can be seen through the conversation they have. It is never certain as to whether Jig will agree to have an abortion, though there is the sense that she is no longer reliant on the American.

Her repetition of feeling fine signifies her belief that everything is turning out the way it should, and that keeping the baby is the right decision.

Although this does seem like a casual conversation, like soemthing that they had discussed many times before, she still does have time to discuss that side with him. She postulates that "the addictive quality of the drink…is meant to emphasize the addictive nature of the couple's lifestyle…It is an empty, meaningless existence that revolves around traveling, sex, drinking, looking at things, and having pointless conversations about these things".

It's really not anything. Hemingway uses symbolism to highlight to the reader the possibility that Jig may be pregnant or is pregnant and has to make a decision. The girl tells the man that she's "fine. We have no clear ideas about the nature of the discussion abortionand yet the dialogue does convey everything that we conclude about the characters.

Despite his claims, it seems unlikely that the man will support any decision by Jig to have the baby. I wouldn't have you do it if you didn't want to," he is not convincing.

Hills Like White Elephants

Their life of transience, of instability, is described by the girl as living on the surface: There is also a sense that the relationship between Jig and the American may have run its course, a point that can be seen at the end of the story when the American is at the bar in the train station having a drink while Jig remains sitting down at the table.

In other words, it will take an exceptionally perceptive reader to realize immediately that the couple is arguing about the girl's having an abortion at a time when abortions were absolutely illegal, considered immoral, and usually dangerous.

Whether they are deliberately ironic and self-consciously sarcastic is another question. Their luggage has "labels on them from all the hotels where they had spent nights. It is as if she has heard all she needs to hear and her mind is made up about the child and the path the relationship is taking.

In an exchange toward the end of the story, the woman seeks solace in the liberating consequence of the abortion only to have the man dampen those expectations despite his advocacy of her having the abortion. Then, such authors as Dickens or Trollope would often address their readers directly.

However, for the girl, this life of being ever in flux, living in hotels, traveling, and never settling down has become wearying. Cite Post McManus, Dermot.

In response to her retraction the man simply asks her about having another drink. In part, some of the early rejection of this story lies in the fact that none of the editors who read it had any idea what was going on in the story. What is clear to the reader at the end of the story is that the American is using logic to try and persuade Jig to have an abortion no child means they can continue living as they have been while Jig knows that even if she does not have the child things will not be the same with the American.

Despite his claims, it seems unlikely that the man will support any decision by Jig to have the baby. In contrast, we have no idea how to react to Hemingway's characters. Hemingway leaves the story with a cliffhanger ending: The girl is hurt by the man's fraudulent, patronizing empathy, and she is also deeply apprehensive about the operation that she will undergo in Madrid.

He has gotten his way, apparently, all throughout their relationship up to this point. Hoping perhaps to break the ice, the woman observes the hills off in the distance: Whether she will actually have the abortion once she gets there is yet another question that Hemingway leaves open.

Can we, however, assume something about them — for example, is "the man" somewhat older and "the girl" perhaps younger, maybe eighteen or nineteen? Coming back, he walked through the bar-room, where people waiting for the train were drinking. It's the only thing that's made us unhappy.

He looked up the tracks but could not see the train. This sentence embodies the entire piece:"Hills Like White Elephants" is a short story by Ernest Hemingway. It was first published in Augustin the literary magazine transition, then later in the short story collection Men Without Women.

In “Hills like White Elephants”, the setting of the story is symbolic to the main character’s dilemma. The author, Ernest Hemingway gives just enough information by using symbols in the story so the reader can draw a deeper meaning to what is being detailed. Jig isn't, shall we say, the most fleshed-out characters in literature.

The lack of physical and biographical details about her makes her a bit of a blank—we don't know where she comes from, and we don't know how she ended up in Spain.

Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway

At the very end of his short story “Hills Like White Elephants,” Ernest Hemingway fails to make absolutely clear the decision that the couple finally make: do they plan to have an abortion (as.

Hills Like White Elephants, by Ernest Hemingway Essay Words | 12 Pages. stories. One very interesting short story is called “Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway. Ernest Hemingway shows the themes in his writing by being very obvious about. "Hills Like White Elephants" does not tell a story in a traditional manner, and it has no plot.

In part, some of the early rejection of this story lies in the fact that none of the editors who read it had any idea what was going on in the story.

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The decision of jig in the short story hills like white elephants by ernest hemingway
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